Saturday, March 10, 2007

Mind Exerciser Number Two


I mentioned before that I’ve been a fan of Aesop’s Fables for some time, one of my passions being to rewrite them for children, trying to keep out the brutality or violence which is often featured. As you may already know, they are fun to read and usually come with a moral. It’s been my experience that frequently you will see a lesson other than the moral that’s given and oftentimes a fable can be applied several different ways.

Well, here’s one for you today, adapted just a bit. I see a particular lesson here, and I wonder if there are not several applications. There probably are. Read it and see what you think. If you feel inclined, tell us. There’s no right or wrong on this and no winner. Just a little exercise in thinking. Next Friday, I’ll give my version of the moral, which I’ve already written out on paper. Enjoy!

The Jackdaw and the Pigeons

Once there was a jackdaw who was watching some pigeons in a farmyard and noticed how well they were fed and how well they got along. Filled with envy, he determined that he would disguise himself as one of them, in order to secure a share of the good things they enjoyed. So, he whitened his feathers and slipped in among the pigeons one evening just as it was getting dark. As long as he kept silent he escaped notice, but soon he grew bolder, and feeling very jolly in his new home, he burst into a hearty laugh. His voice betrayed him and at once the pigeons saw through his disguise. They pecked at the poor jackdaw unmercifully and drove him out from among them. Afterwards, he tried to join the other jackdaws again, but his old friends did not recognize him in his white dress and would not allow him to eat with them and drove him out from their society as well.

7 comments:

Mrs. S said...

Am I allowed to particpate?

Maxine said...

By all means, Mrs. S. I really want to hear what you have to say!

chrisd said...

I like it-great idea!

Sara said...

Hmmmm...well the fable reminds me of people (of all ages!) who will pick and make fun of another person because he might not look like "one of them" or belong in their group.

Neesie said...

This story reminds me very much of the story of the Prodigal Son which is found in Luke. I think that the jackdaw's friends should have accepted him just as the Prodigal Son's father did on his return.

Mrs. S said...

I had a couple of thoughts ...

1. Be content in your state.

2. Insincerity shines through.

Beka said...

Sorry that it took me so long to comment on this post: I finally have some free moments!

I've been thinking about this, and the main thing I see here is that we ought to be content with our lot, because if we get carried away in discontentment, we just might lose what we have been given.

Thanks for posting this!